Home Local News Join the Global Big Latch On!

Join the Global Big Latch On!

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Where:                        Lakeside Church, Fairway, Southport, PR9 0LA

Ormskirk Guide Hut, Green Lane, Ormskirk, L39 1QR

 

When:                         Friday August 2 2018

1030 at Southport – please arrive early

0930 – 1130 at Ormskirk

 

More info:                   More information about the Global Big Latch On can be accessed here.

 

Join the annual Global Big Latch On event. The Latch On sees thousands of breastfeeding women and their babies come together for a synchronised feeding event, in multiple locations around the world. This year the goal is to break the current Global Big Latch On record of almost 21,500 children breastfeeding at 778 locations, across 28 countries.

Southport and Ormskirk hospitals NHS Trust are co-hosting two events in west Lancashire and Merseyside, aiming to support local breastfeeding mums. Staff from Families and Babies Breastfeeding support (FAB), plus midwives and health visitors will all be on hand to offer advice and help to any mums with questions or queries.

Lesley Fawcett, infant feeding coordinator at Ormskirk hospital explains more: “The Global Big Latch On is an incredible event, taking place around the world during Breast Feeding Week (1-7 August). People gather together to breastfeed and offer peer support. It is all part of making breastfeeding a normal part of day to day life, and helping to promote it throughout our communities.

“We hope lots of people come along to get involved, last year we had just under 100 babies latch on across three events. This year we have just two events, but we are looking forward seeing even more mums and beautiful babies join us to latch on!”

To find out more about the support provided by FAB in west Lancashire for breast feeding families, please call the helpline on 01254 772 929. This is manned seven days a week by trained peer supporters, or visit www.familiesandbabies.org.uk.

Breastfeeding contributes to the normal growth and development of babies and children, those who are not breastfed are at increased risk of infant morbidity and mortality, adult obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and premenopausal breast cancer and ovarian cancer. The World Health Organisation recommends breastfeeding exclusively for the first six months of a baby’s life to optimise these benefits, continuing to breastfeed for two years and as long thereafter as is mutually desired by a woman and her child.

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